Amy Ta

Amy Ta

Digital News & Culture Editor

KCRW Staff/Producer

Amy Ta has worked in public media since 2010, having produced NPR's Tell Me More with Michel Martin, Weekend Edition and NPR Music. She also produced the independent podcast Tiny Spark: Investigating the Business of Doing Good. She came to KCRW in 2016 as a producer for Press Play with Madeleine Brand. In 2019, she joined the digital staff to produce web features and capture photos for Press Play, Greater LA, Design & Architecture, Good Food, and The Business. 

Amy Ta on KCRW

The “Queer Eye” star opens up about being sexually abused at a young age, and how that trauma led to binging and purging, abusing drugs, and becoming a sex worker.

Jonathan Van Ness on sexual abuse and self-worth

The “Queer Eye” star opens up about being sexually abused at a young age, and how that trauma led to binging and purging, abusing drugs, and becoming a sex worker.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Fires ravaged San Diego in 2007, and scheduled power shut-offs caused chaos. Since then, the city has made improvements to their power grid and their scheduled outage procedures.

Lessons from San Diego’s planned blackouts

Fires ravaged San Diego in 2007, and scheduled power shut-offs caused chaos. Since then, the city has made improvements to their power grid and their scheduled outage procedures.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

What will change the minds of climate change skeptics? An astrophysics professor suggests reframing the climate debate in a more positive light -- as a result of human evolution.

Taking politics out of the climate change debate

What will change the minds of climate change skeptics? An astrophysics professor suggests reframing the climate debate in a more positive light -- as a result of human evolution.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

There’s a lot of tension around immigration and the border, but could something as simple as a taco be a unifier, especially on this National Taco Day?

When Gavin Newsom signed AB387 into law today, he ended 16 years of unsuccessful attempts by daycare providers statewide to unionize.

from KCRW Features

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

Are you an EV owner who has trouble finding a charging station? Are you a renter who's hesitant to go electric? Do the environmental benefits outweigh the inconvenience?

from Greater LA

Democrat Monique Limon announced she will run for Hannah Beth Jackson’s coveted state senate seat.

from Curious Coast

Presidential campaigns aren’t just on TV anymore, they’re on countless digital platforms.

from To the Point

Buckle up.

from Left, Right & Center

These are some interesting texts.

from Left, Right & Center

Starting October 29, LAX won’t allow curbside pickup from companies like Uber and Lyft.

from Greater LA