Andrew Hartmann

Illinois State University

Guest

Andrew Hartmann is a professor of history at Illinois State University and the author of A War for the Soul of America: A History of the Culture Wars.

Andrew Hartmann on KCRW

Bill Clinton's winning campaigns for the White House operated on the basic premise that, "It's the economy, stupid."

Can the Democrats deliver 'a better deal?'

Bill Clinton's winning campaigns for the White House operated on the basic premise that, "It's the economy, stupid."

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