Anne Wells

Planning Manager and the Advance Planning Division at the City of Goleta

Planning Manager and the Advance Planning Division at the City of Goleta

Anne Wells on KCRW

California monarchs are in dramatic decline.

Goleta rehabilitates historic Eucalyptus grove to bring back monarch butterflies

California monarchs are in dramatic decline.

from The 805

More from KCRW

The last standing nuclear power plant in California may face safety issues if there's an electrical power outage during wildfire season.

from The 805

Fires ravaged San Diego in 2007, and scheduled power shut-offs caused chaos. Since then, the city has made improvements to their power grid and their scheduled outage procedures.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Pacific Standard employees took to social media to express their shock and anxieties over the magazine’s abrupt end.

from The 805

Scientists hope to reduce whale fatalities from ship collisions by using a new sound technology that detects when the endangered animals are present, and then alerts cargo ships to…

from Greater LA

Table setting is one of the most exciting competitions at the Ventura County Fair. Newly elected LA City Councilman John Lee shares his plans around homelessness and transportation.

from Greater LA

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

From political action to banning plastics, humans are finding ways to confront climate change.

from News Stories

Scientists hope to reduce whale fatalities from ship collisions.

from The 805

Mountain lions now roam the hills surrounding Los Angeles.

from Greater LA