Ansel Garcia-Langley

co-captain of Santa Monica High School’s Team Marine

Ansel Garcia-Langley on KCRW

It’s been a year since Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg began her school strike on the steps of her country’s Parliament, in order to draw attention to climate change.

Teens take the lead on cleaning the planet. Will adults follow?

It’s been a year since Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg began her school strike on the steps of her country’s Parliament, in order to draw attention to climate change.

from Design and Architecture

More from KCRW

A gripping documentary documents the surprising role drug cartels and illegal traffickers are playing in the looming extinction of a rare whale.

from Scheer Intelligence

XOTX Tropico Nursery, founded in 1988, is a haven for endangered plant life. But now it’s endangered itself. The owner is required to vacate the nursery by December 30.

from Greater LA

The  Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy  in Goleta recently received preliminary approval from the Santa Barbara Unified School District for a new $16 million addition.

from KCRW Features

It’s been two years since the Thomas Fire erupted in Ventura County.

from KCRW Features

Trojan Shelter is a new homeless shelter in LA, where college students receive three meals a day, peer-to-peer counseling, and assistance in finding permanent housing.

from Greater LA

Angelenos can reduce their carbon footprints by composting, but finding a place to do that is tough.

from Greater LA

Fires ravaged San Diego in 2007, and scheduled power shut-offs caused chaos. Since then, the city has made improvements to their power grid and their scheduled outage procedures.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Easy Fire has burned more than 1,700 acres and is 10% contained. 26,000 people are estimated to be affected. Some 800 firefighters are on the scene.

from KCRW Features

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point