Aravind Adiga

Novelist, author of “The White Tiger”

Novelist and author of “The White Tiger”

Aravind Adiga on KCRW

The new Netflix movie “The White Tiger” is based on the darkly comic novel of the same name, which follows the rise of Balram, a clever servant played by Adarsh Gourav.

‘The White Tiger’: Ramin Bahrani turned his friend Aravind Adiga’s novel into a hit film some 30 years after they met

The new Netflix movie “The White Tiger” is based on the darkly comic novel of the same name, which follows the rise of Balram, a clever servant played by Adarsh Gourav.

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