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Arnav Jhala

Guest

Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he heads the Computational Cinematics Studio in the department of Computer Games and Playable Media

Arnav Jhala on KCRW

California's law to fine retailers of excessively violent video games was put on hold by a federal judge before rules or regulations had been established.

Videogames: Violence, the Law and California's Economy

California's law to fine retailers of excessively violent video games was put on hold by a federal judge before rules or regulations had been established.

from Which Way, L.A.?

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