Asad Abu Sharkh

Political commentator

Guest

Gaza City-based political commentator, not affiliated with either Hamas or Fatah

Asad Abu Sharkh on KCRW

After last year's disastrous  invasion of Lebanon , Israel
says it will not be dragged into a land-invasion of Gaza, but it did strike
three times from the air today after Hamas…

Anarchy in Gaza Pushes Unity Government to the Brink

After last year's disastrous invasion of Lebanon , Israel says it will not be dragged into a land-invasion of Gaza, but it did strike three times from the air today after Hamas…

from To the Point

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