Ashraf Khalil

Time magazine

Guest

Cairo-based reporter for Foreign Policy and Time magazines, and author of Liberation Square: Inside the Egyptian Revolution and the Rebirth of a Nation; former Jerusalem correspondent for the Los Angeles Times

Ashraf Khalil on KCRW

Violence has erupted again in Egypt, where supporters of former President Mohammed Morsi are demonstrating against the government that ousted him in July.

Growing Turmoil in Egypt

Violence has erupted again in Egypt, where supporters of former President Mohammed Morsi are demonstrating against the government that ousted him in July.

from To the Point

Since dictators were deposed by "people power" in Tunisia and Egypt, there's been talk of an "Arab Spring" that would finally bring an end to authoritarianism in the Middle East and…

Are Revolutions Transforming the Middle East?

Since dictators were deposed by "people power" in Tunisia and Egypt, there's been talk of an "Arab Spring" that would finally bring an end to authoritarianism in the Middle East and…

from Which Way, L.A.?

Since the so-called "Arab Spring" began in Tunisia, there's been violence in that country. Today, Egypt's new military leaders formally criminalized protests.

Are Revolutions Transforming the Middle East?

Since the so-called "Arab Spring" began in Tunisia, there's been violence in that country. Today, Egypt's new military leaders formally criminalized protests.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus.

from News Stories

In a world in which global opinion reigns, public diplomacy rooted in nationalism and propaganda will not save us from pressing crises.

from Scheer Intelligence

In 1950, America had the richest middle class in the world, but now U.S. workers face wage stagnation and historic wealth inequality.

from To the Point

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point

In a Dallas courtroom on Wednesday, a former police officer was convicted of murder for killing her African American neighbor, then she got a hug from the victim’s brother and the…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

What will change the minds of climate change skeptics? An astrophysics professor suggests reframing the climate debate in a more positive light -- as a result of human evolution.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Google says its translation service can't replace human translators, but U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services tell officers it's the most efficient tool to vet refugees.

from KCRW Features

Trump’s sometimes, maybe lawyer Rudy Giuliani clearly needs an attorney himself as the investigations involving the former New York City mayor mount.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Presidential campaigns aren’t just on TV anymore, they’re on countless digital platforms.

from To the Point