Austin Beutner

Superintendent of LAUSD

Guest

Publisher of the California News Group and CEO and publisher of the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union-Tribuneco-founder and chairman of the private equity firm Evercore;  former first deputy mayor of Los Angeles and chief executive for economic and business policy, which includes oversight of the Department of Water and Power, the Los Angeles Airports and the Los Angeles Port; former mayoral candidate, 

Austin Beutner on KCRW

After marathon talks with the teachers union, LAUSD Superintendent Austin Beutner tells Press Play he’s tired but happy that educators and students are back in school, “back to what…

LAUSD superintendent Austin Beutner on taking the strike’s momentum to Sacramento for more funding

After marathon talks with the teachers union, LAUSD Superintendent Austin Beutner tells Press Play he’s tired but happy that educators and students are back in school, “back to what…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Written by Amy Ta, produced by Michell Eloy  
 A strike by LAUSD teachers is postponed until Monday. That could give the union, United Teachers Los Angeles, and the district a few…

LAUSD Superintendent Austin Beutner on what happens to students if teachers strike

Written by Amy Ta, produced by Michell Eloy A strike by LAUSD teachers is postponed until Monday. That could give the union, United Teachers Los Angeles, and the district a few…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

On Tuesday, Austin Beutner was named LAUSD’s new superintendent. He’s held high-profile jobs at City Hall and the LA Times. He did very well in private equity before that.

Superintendent Austin Beutner emphasizes kid-centric vision for LAUSD

On Tuesday, Austin Beutner was named LAUSD’s new superintendent. He’s held high-profile jobs at City Hall and the LA Times. He did very well in private equity before that.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

California’s relentless clean-air enforcer, Mary Nichols, has divided the automobile industry. After weeks of secret negotiations, the Chair of the State’s Air Resources Board has announced that Ford, Honda VW and BMW of America won’t go along with President Trump’s rollback of Barack Obama’s fuel-economy standards. Nichols claims it’s an “olive branch,” giving car makers the “flexibility” to clean up the air at the same time they continue to market vehicles that make the most money. Brady Dennis of the Washington Post calls it a “big deal,” even if Toyota, GM and 11 other companies revert to Trump’s new federal standards--at least for the moment. Alan Baum is a consultant for both the industry and environmental organizations. He says the four who made the deal with California have a slight lead on their competitors in developing the technology of the future, with China currently far ahead of them all. He says the western car makers are doing a poor job of educating consumers about the benefits of hybrids and electrics. Nichols’s history with the Air Resources Board goes back to the 1970’s. She was named Chair by Republican Governor Arnold Schwartenegger and reappointed by Democrats Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom. She made an international name for herself for years ago when she blew the whistle on Volkswagen for faking emissions tests on the diesel cars it sold for decades all over the world.

from To the Point

Orange County Democrats are celebrating a victory that seemed almost impossible 10 years ago.

from KCRW Features

Host Steve Chiotakis goes on a grunion run. Embattled LA County Sheriff Alex Villanueva takes tough questions from KCRW's Warren Olney.

from Greater LA

The death of the nation’s longest serving federal judge is a reminder about our lack of effective judicial oversight.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Despite thousands of requests to repair LA’s sidewalks each year, city officials say they can only manage to fix about ten a month.

from Greater LA

Last week's mass shooting in El Paso has been particularly painful for Angelenos, because so many have close ties to that city.

from Greater LA

Jeffrey Epstein was found dead in his cell at the Manhattan Correctional Center on Saturday, as he awaited trial. What happens next in the investigation?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

The original purpose of cities was to bring people together. That was their function for thousands of years. Then came the 20th Century and the automobile, which, “blew cities apart.”

from To the Point

Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before congress, but does he say anything new?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers