Avik Roy

Bipartisan Policy Center / Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity

Guest

Avik Roy is a senior advisor at the Bipartisan Policy Center and the co-founder and president of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity. He writes on healthcare policy for the National Review Online and Forbes.

Roy formerly served as a healthcare analyst at Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Company, a boutique brokerage in New York and as a member of the Board of Policy Advisors for the Heartland Institute, a free market policy think-tank.

Avik Roy on KCRW

Is it still just smoke? Or is there a fire?

It looks like Donald Trump Jr TRIED to collude with the Russians

Is it still just smoke? Or is there a fire?

from Left, Right & Center

Last night House Republican leaders published  21 pages of modifications  to the American Health Care Act, the bill designed to replace Obamacare.

Scrambling to round up votes, House revises health bill

Last night House Republican leaders published 21 pages of modifications to the American Health Care Act, the bill designed to replace Obamacare.

from To the Point

The  US Supreme Court  opened a new session today with an unexpected challenge.

Healthcare Reform: Should Obama Have Fought for Single-Payer?

The US Supreme Court opened a new session today with an unexpected challenge.

from Which Way, L.A.?

More from KCRW

President Donald Trump holds a press conference.

President Trump is holding a press conference at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In a speech to the U.N.

from News Stories

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus.

from News Stories

Despite mounting evidence, Republicans in the House and the Senate are defending President Trump or keeping their heads down. Veteran GOP conservatives accuse them of sacrificing morality for short-term political gain. Meantime the Trump Administration calls the impeachment inquiry “unconstitutional,” while legal scholars point out that it’s part of Article II. And how did Ukraine, an obscure former Soviet republic, become so important? Money.

from To the Point

The goods movement is the backbone of Southern California’s Inland Empire. With the threat of automation looming, what’s going to happen to the people getting replaced by robots?

from Greater LA

In 1950, America had the richest middle class in the world, but now U.S. workers face wage stagnation and historic wealth inequality.

from To the Point

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point

Democrat Monique Limon announced she will run for Hannah Beth Jackson’s coveted state senate seat.

from Curious Coast

Twelve candidates are taking the stage at 5 PM PT at the CNN/New York Times Democratic Debate, hosted at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio

from KCRW Features