Betty Yee

California Board of Equalization

Guest

Member of the California Board of Equalization; Democratic candidate for California State Controller

Betty Yee on KCRW

The State Controller is elected statewide as California’s chief financial officer—ensuring that the budget is spent the way it’s supposed to be and that the state’s bills are paid on…

California’s Top Fiscal Officer: Whom Do You Choose?

The State Controller is elected statewide as California’s chief financial officer—ensuring that the budget is spent the way it’s supposed to be and that the state’s bills are paid on…

from Which Way, L.A.?

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