Bill Gross

Idealab / eSolar

Guest

CEO, founder and chairman of eSolar, a Pasadena, California-based green energy technology provider, and founding chairman of parent company, Idealab

Bill Gross on KCRW

In recent years, we've seen the rise of the Design Entrepreneur.

Design Accelerator

In recent years, we've seen the rise of the Design Entrepreneur.

from Design and Architecture

Los Angeles may be America's biggest manufacturing center, but it's also notorious as a hard place to do business.

LA's New Job Czar; Pasadena Green Energy Leader's China Contract

Los Angeles may be America's biggest manufacturing center, but it's also notorious as a hard place to do business.

from Which Way, L.A.?

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Two artists draw from their cultural backgrounds to respond to today’s social unrest and disparities. A group show shifts its focus to highlight isolation and race in America.

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Good Food examines the ways food has been weaponized to create stereotypes and stigmatization.

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David Bell closed his gallery, Visitor Welcome Center, in March. Then he got an unconventional request — curate a year of exhibitions on someone’s arm.