Bita Moghaddam

Author; Professor of behavioral neuroscience and psychiatry, Oregon Health and Science University

Professor of behavioral neuroscience and psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University and the author of “Ketamine”

Bita Moghaddam on KCRW

Ketamine, commonly used as an anesthetic and tranquilizer, has gone from club drug to an expensive spa treatment for depression. Could it be the next Prozac?

The nature and potential of ketamine

Ketamine, commonly used as an anesthetic and tranquilizer, has gone from club drug to an expensive spa treatment for depression. Could it be the next Prozac?

from Life Examined

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