Bronwen Maddox

Prospect magazine

Guest

Editor of Prospect, a monthly news magazine in London; Economics columnist, and former London Chief Foreign Commentator, for The Times of London and author of In Defense of America

Bronwen Maddox on KCRW

Europe's debt crisis is causing financial ripples all over the world, and elected leaders are trying to prevent a tidal wave.

European and US Economies at the Tipping Point?

Europe's debt crisis is causing financial ripples all over the world, and elected leaders are trying to prevent a tidal wave.

from Which Way, L.A.?

It's not just Greece any more but larger countries facing an economic crisis. If they can't pay their debts, the big fear is collapse of a major financial institution.

Economics and Politics in the Euro Zone

It's not just Greece any more but larger countries facing an economic crisis. If they can't pay their debts, the big fear is collapse of a major financial institution.

from To the Point

Americans are about to celebrate the Fourth of July at a time when America's international reputation has been in decline.

Hollywood, Smart Power and Public Diplomacy

Americans are about to celebrate the Fourth of July at a time when America's international reputation has been in decline.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Election officials in LA County want to make voting easier, more accessible, and more secure.

from KCRW Features

More adults are living with their parents now than they have in more than a century. It’s a third of all adults under 34. But in Los Angeles, it’s more than 40% .

from Greater LA

Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point

The goods movement is the backbone of Southern California’s Inland Empire. With the threat of automation looming, what’s going to happen to the people getting replaced by robots?

from Greater LA

Greta Thunberg inspired Fridays for Future--school strikes around the world.  Were the leaders of major polluters paying attention? Not according to what they told the United Nations.

from To the Point

Malcolm Gladwell’s latest book, “Talking to Strangers,” is out, while he’s hosting the podcast, “Revisionist History.”

from To the Point

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus.

from News Stories

President Donald Trump holds a press conference.

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point