Cal Newport

associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University and author of “Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World”

Cal Newport on KCRW

Some people are trying to dial back on their phone habit by visiting private clubs with no-phone policies.

Purge your phone: the case for digital minimalism

Some people are trying to dial back on their phone habit by visiting private clubs with no-phone policies.

from Design and Architecture

Some people are trying to dial back on their phone habit by visiting private clubs with no-phone policies.

Purge your phone: the case for digital minimalism

Some people are trying to dial back on their phone habit by visiting private clubs with no-phone policies.

from Design and Architecture

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