Charles Fishman

journalist and author

Guest

As a reporter, Charles Fishman has tried to get inside organizations, both familiar and secret, and explain how they work.

In the course of reporting about water to write The Big Thirst, Fishman has stood at the bottom of a half-million-gallon sewage tank, sampled water directly from the springs in San Pellegrino, Italy, and Poland Spring, Maine, and carried water on his head for 3 km with a group of Indian villagers.

Fishman’s previous book, the New York Times bestseller The Wal-Mart Effect, was the first to crack open Wal-Mart’s wall of secrecy, and has become the standard for understanding Wal-Mart’s impact on our economy and on how we live. The Economist named it a “book of the year.”

Fishman is a former metro and national reporter for the Washington Post, and was a reporter and editor at the Orlando Sentinel and the News & Observer in Raleigh, NC. Since 1996, he has worked for the innovative business magazine Fast Company. Fishman has won numerous awards, including three times receiving UCLA’s Gerald Loeb Award, the most prestigious award in business journalism.

Charles Fishman on KCRW

At the Democratic debate in Flint, Michigan last Sunday, presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton called for Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to resign over the lead…

Awash in Worry: Tap Water in America

At the Democratic debate in Flint, Michigan last Sunday, presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton called for Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to resign over the lead…

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

In the fourth year of a serious California drought, you’d think the Golden State might shrivel up and keel over.

Winning the Drought

In the fourth year of a serious California drought, you’d think the Golden State might shrivel up and keel over.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Yesterday’s water main break in Westwood sent millions of gallons of water flooding nearby streets and UCLA. This didn’t happen out out the blue. In 2009, L.A.

The Water Beneath Our Feet

Yesterday’s water main break in Westwood sent millions of gallons of water flooding nearby streets and UCLA. This didn’t happen out out the blue. In 2009, L.A.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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