DONATE!

close

Chris Steiner

Guest

Author of Automate This: How Algorithms Came to Rule Our World

Chris Steiner on KCRW

The Wall Street market maker Knight Capital is back in business today, at a much-reduced value, despite the  chaos caused by a computer malfunction  last week.

Knight Capital and High Speed Trading on Wall Street

The Wall Street market maker Knight Capital is back in business today, at a much-reduced value, despite the chaos caused by a computer malfunction last week.

from Which Way, L.A.?

Knight Capital is a so-called "market maker," using high-speed computers to keep Wall Street fair and orderly. Last week  it created chaos  instead.

Algorithms on Wall Street and in the Rest of Our Lives

Knight Capital is a so-called "market maker," using high-speed computers to keep Wall Street fair and orderly. Last week it created chaos instead.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

The government reopens (for now) after Trump caves on his wall demands.

from Left, Right & Center

Stacey Abrams, who narrowly lost the Georgia governor’s race in November, is delivering the Democrats’ response to President Trump’s State of the Union address.

from News Stories

The Green New Deal targets climate change--but that’s not all.

from To the Point

President Trump asked for unity from a newly divided Congress--which has more women than ever before.

from To the Point

In conversation with Robert Scheer, Ron Kovic and Maj. Danny Sjursen examine their roles in our nation's bloody trajectory since the Vietnam War.

from Scheer Intelligence

American-born journalist Jason Rezaian spent a year and a half in one of Iran’s toughest prisons. He was accused of espionage.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Demands for the impeachment of President Trump are on the rise since Democrats re-took the House. But, what if the Senate refused to convict him?

from To the Point

Politically, Trump’s great wall may not be worth the government shutdown. But it appeals to his base, including evangelical Christians.

from To the Point

More than 800,000 federal employees continue to go without pay in what could soon be the longest government shutdown yet.

from Left, Right & Center