Christopher Fettweis

Assistant Professor ot National Security Affairs at the US Navel War College

Guest

Assistant Professor of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College

Christopher Fettweis on KCRW

Defeat in war can have "unintended, seemingly inexplicable consequences." Upset defeats can be especially damaging to a nation's psyche.

Post-Iraq Syndrome

Defeat in war can have "unintended, seemingly inexplicable consequences." Upset defeats can be especially damaging to a nation's psyche.

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