Clint Swett

Staff writer for the Sacramento Bee

Guest

Staff writer for the Sacramento Bee

Clint Swett on KCRW

Christmas trees on the West Lawn of the State Capitol are nothing new, but on this year's 56-foot-tall white fir, 6500 lights are powered by a type of generator that's never been used…

Christmas Tree Fuelled by Hydrogen Fuel Cell

Christmas trees on the West Lawn of the State Capitol are nothing new, but on this year's 56-foot-tall white fir, 6500 lights are powered by a type of generator that's never been used…

from Which Way, L.A.?

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