Connie Chavez

Latina Magazine

Guest

Video department manager for Latina Magazine.

Connie Chavez on KCRW

You might have seen a new word floating around on social media and in some news articles: Latinx. It’s meant to be gender-nonconforming. Some people are happy about the inclusivity.

Should 'Latinx' replace 'Latino' and 'Latina?'

You might have seen a new word floating around on social media and in some news articles: Latinx. It’s meant to be gender-nonconforming. Some people are happy about the inclusivity.

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