Craig Colten

Louisiana State University

Guest

Professor of Geography at Louisiana State University, editor of Geographical Review and author of An Unnatural Metropolis: Wresting New Orleans from Nature

Craig Colten on KCRW

Since the great flood of 1927 killed hundreds of people, the Army Corps of Engineers has built 2000 miles of levees to tame the Mississippi.

Can Man Control the Mighty Mississippi River?

Since the great flood of 1927 killed hundreds of people, the Army Corps of Engineers has built 2000 miles of levees to tame the Mississippi.

from Which Way, L.A.?

The Mississippi watershed is the world's third largest after the Amazon and the Congo.

Has Flood Control Led to a False Sense of Security?

The Mississippi watershed is the world's third largest after the Amazon and the Congo.

from To the Point

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