Cyn Yamashiro

professor of Law at Loyola Law School

Guest

Professor of Law at Loyola Law School and Director of its Center for Juvenile Law and Policy

Cyn Yamashiro on KCRW

When nine black teenagers were convicted of the Halloween beating of three white women in Long Beach, there was delight on one side and outrage on the other.  As the when teens were…

Was the Judge Lenient in Sentencing Long Beach Teens?

When nine black teenagers were convicted of the Halloween beating of three white women in Long Beach, there was delight on one side and outrage on the other.  As the when teens were…

from Which Way, L.A.?

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