Daniel Indiviglio

Atlantic magazine

Guest

Associate Editor of the Atlantic magazine, where he writes about finance and fiscal policy

Daniel Indiviglio on KCRW

In February, the economy added 194,000 new jobs, and  216,000 in March .  That's good news.

The Paradox of the Dropping Unemployment Rate

In February, the economy added 194,000 new jobs, and 216,000 in March .  That's good news.

from To the Point

Republicans are preparing for next year's elections by denouncing President Obama as a big spender and demanding cuts in everything but the Pentagon.

Are Americans Confused About What They Care About?

Republicans are preparing for next year's elections by denouncing President Obama as a big spender and demanding cuts in everything but the Pentagon.

from To the Point

Jeffrey Immelt , the CEO of General Electric will succeed Paul Volcker as President Obama's principal economic advisor.

Obama Creates New Jobs Panel, Taps GE CEO as Chair

Jeffrey Immelt , the CEO of General Electric will succeed Paul Volcker as President Obama's principal economic advisor.

from To the Point

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P eople like Becky Dennison are working to address to one  of America’s most urgent crises with a straightforward approach.

from Scheer Intelligence

The House of Representatives appears to be moving toward impeachment of President Trump.

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

For months, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi resisted the mounting calls from her caucus to start impeachment proceedings.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Democrat Monique Limon announced she will run for Hannah Beth Jackson’s coveted state senate seat.

from Curious Coast

Nearly 200 years ago, the Cherokee Nation signed a treaty with the United States. The result? They were forcibly removed from the Southeastern part of the U.S. to Oklahoma.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

President Trump is holding a press conference at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In a speech to the U.N.

from News Stories

Jet aircraft, carrier task forces and tanks consume vast amounts of fossil fuel--while emitting vast amounts of greenhouse gases. The Pentagon’s carbon footprint is bigger than those of many entire nations. Now, it’s caught in the middle. It’s a massive contributor to climate change, which is threatening its mission worldwide. Seaports and airstrips are being flooded or burned out, and restoring operations costs many millions of dollars. Meantime, environmental damage is leading to instability and the prospect of international violence. Water shortages have increased tensions in the Middle East and caused new hostilities between India and Pakistan, two nuclear powers. Russia and China are taking advantage of changing conditions. Will politicians who scorn environmentalists and mistrust climate scientists listen to the warnings of military leaders?

from To the Point

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

The House Judiciary Committee will vote this week to formalize impeachment investigation procedures

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers