David Brodsly

author of “LA Freeway: An Appreciative Essay”

Guest

David Brodsly on KCRW

Freeways were originally conceived as part of a vision for a better tomorrow.

Freeways used to symbolize freedom. Not anymore.

Freeways were originally conceived as part of a vision for a better tomorrow.

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