David Greenberg

Rutgers University

Guest

David Greenberg is Professor of History and of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University, and the author of Republic of Spin: An Inside History of the American Presidency. A former contributing editor at the New Republic, he writes for several publications including Politico, Slate, the New York Times Book Review and the Op-Ed pages of the Los Angeles Times.

David Greenberg on KCRW

Impeachment by Democrats in the House may lead to trial in the Senate, with Chief Justice John Roberts presiding.  Can he prevent the Republican majority from rushing to judgement?

High crimes and misdemeanors: how much will they matter?

Impeachment by Democrats in the House may lead to trial in the Senate, with Chief Justice John Roberts presiding.  Can he prevent the Republican majority from rushing to judgement?

from To the Point

President George H.W. Bush died on Friday. He was 94.

A critical look at the legacy of George H. W. Bush

President George H.W. Bush died on Friday. He was 94.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The Constitution prohibits public officials — including the President — from financial conflicts of interest — domestic or foreign.

Is Donald Trump thumbing his nose at the Founding Fathers?

The Constitution prohibits public officials — including the President — from financial conflicts of interest — domestic or foreign.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Panelists discuss revelations from the House hearings on the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Plus, the Federal Reserve takes big action on inflation.

from Left, Right & Center

Panelists discuss the bipartisan deal struck in the Senate on gun safety, as well as the testimony of Republican election officials who stood up to former President Donald Trump’s…

from Left, Right & Center

On the day the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, staff at a San Antonio abortion clinic had to turn away patients who were already scheduled for the procedure there.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

For generations, Catholic schools have represented a pathway to the middle class for immigrants. But thousands have closed, the latest in Boyle Heights.

from Greater LA

More than 66,000 people are unhoused in LA County. UCLA researchers are trying to predict who is most likely to become homeless, so officials can intervene before it happens.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

The LA Regional Food Bank saw a dip in demand at the beginning of the year, but as inflation drives up food prices, more people are lining up for food handouts.

from KCRW Features