David Welna

NPR

Guest

David Welna is national security correspondent at NPR.

David Welna on KCRW

It's the most isolated nation in the modern world, a closed society that the information age has barely penetrated, a place where teenagers have never heard of Beyonce and Facebook is…

Inside the Hermit Kingdom: Eyewitness views from North Korea

It's the most isolated nation in the modern world, a closed society that the information age has barely penetrated, a place where teenagers have never heard of Beyonce and Facebook is…

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