Dion Nissenbaum

Wall Street Journal

Guest

Correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and author of A Street Divided: Stories from Jerusalem's Alley of God; former Jerusalem bureau chief for McClatchy Newspapers

Dion Nissenbaum on KCRW

Turkey today escalated its fight against ISIS by sending tanks, warplanes and special operations forces into the Syrian town of Jarabulus. American airplanes joined the operation.

Turkish ground troops launch offensive in Syria

Turkey today escalated its fight against ISIS by sending tanks, warplanes and special operations forces into the Syrian town of Jarabulus. American airplanes joined the operation.

from To the Point

In 2015, US-backed negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians hit a diplomatic wall, and there's no place that demonstrates the complexity of the conflict better than a tiny…

The Street at the Epicenter of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

In 2015, US-backed negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians hit a diplomatic wall, and there's no place that demonstrates the complexity of the conflict better than a tiny…

from To the Point

As the Israeli-Palestinian stand-off continues, there's no place that demonstrates the complexity of the issues that a street in Jerusalem called “The Alley of God.”

A Street at the Epicenter of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

As the Israeli-Palestinian stand-off continues, there's no place that demonstrates the complexity of the issues that a street in Jerusalem called “The Alley of God.”

from To the Point

More from KCRW

The goods movement is the backbone of Southern California’s Inland Empire. With the threat of automation looming, what’s going to happen to the people getting replaced by robots?

from Greater LA

Since March some 387 Boeing 737 Max jets have been grounded by regulators and airlines with no end in sight. Boeing profits have tanked. Last month the company recorded its biggest ever quarterly loss and deliveries are at their lowest since 2012. Boeing says it expects the plane to return to service by the end of this year, as it continues to focus on the plane’s software system, thought to be the cause of both plane crashes. Boeing’s crisis highlights a problem beyond flight safety. The aircraft manufacturer chose to prioritize big spending on CEO compensation and stock buybacks rather than reinvest profits on its employees, infrastructure and R and D. Last year alone, Boeing’s chief executive Dennis Muilenburg took home $30 in compensation and gains from options. Buybacks over investment; the financial strategy that’s great for shareholders but may well have cost Boeing the public’s trust.

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Former FBI agent Asha Rangappa is our special guest!

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Nearly 200 years ago, the Cherokee Nation signed a treaty with the United States. The result? They were forcibly removed from the Southeastern part of the U.S. to Oklahoma.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein apparently killed himself over the weekend. He was in the secure housing unit in a Manhattan jail.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

“We can’t recycle our way out of this crisis.” That’s according to California’s Democratic State Senator Ben Allen-- just one of many politicians around the country proposing to ban all straws, bags and other single-use plastics. At the overwhelmed Recycling Center in Burbank, California, Kreigh Hample says, “Our packaging has gone up exponentially in just the last few decades… it’s a sad story in the way we eat, the way we dispose of things and the way that we’re living.” A throwaway culture may be convenient, but the costs include cleaning it up with taxpayer money--not to mention worldwide pollution. China now requires recycled products so pure that the bottom’s gone out of the market, but the plastics industry is bigger than ever. Former EPA official Judith Judith Enck says half the world’s plastics have been produced in the past 13 years. One new process has developed from coal fracking, and development is being encouraged by President Trump with support from the fossil fuel industry. But just 9% of the plastic produced is getting recycled. Some goes to landfills, but the rest turns into worldwide pollution. Images of plastic waste floating by the acre in the Pacific Ocean are all too familiar; microplastics are turning up from the depths of the seas to the remotest parts of the Arctic. In Texas and other states, it’s illegal to ban plastic products. But, in Sacramento, Allen says it’s time to hold the plastics industry accountable. California is big enough to influence the nation’s economy, so his efforts are being scrutinized by politicians and advocates around the country.

from To the Point

The two international giants are linked in inextricable ways, and yet Americans’ understanding of China consistently lacks nuance.

from Scheer Intelligence

What did President Trump do this time?

from Left, Right & Center

Absolute immunity, executive privilege, crony privilege?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers