Donnell Alexander

Donnell Alexander

Journalist, author

Donnell Alexander is a Los Angeles based creator of cultural content whose writing, storytelling, and commentary has been featured by KCRW, TIME, Al Jazeera’s Inside Story, and Narrative Global Politics (Routledge, 2016). His most Recent short film (with Sika Stanton) is An Oregon County (Oregon Humanities, 2017)

Donnell Alexander on KCRW

CUTLER, CA—Outside a convenience store just down the road from where he recently graduated high school, David Vigil talks to me about how his large extended family must cope with…

Undrinkable water in California’s Central Valley

CUTLER, CA—Outside a convenience store just down the road from where he recently graduated high school, David Vigil talks to me about how his large extended family must cope with…

from News Stories

The California Water Resources Control Board reports that 360,000 Californians don't have access to clean drinking water.

Undrinkable water

The California Water Resources Control Board reports that 360,000 Californians don't have access to clean drinking water.

from KCRW Features

The boys in New Edition were basketball fans from Boston - Celtics country. So what happened when they hung out with the L.A.

New Edition’s Neighborhood Secret

The boys in New Edition were basketball fans from Boston - Celtics country. So what happened when they hung out with the L.A.

from Lost Notes

More from KCRW

Producer Bethany Denton wants to know if her meat-eater’s guilt is justified.

from Here Be Monsters

Ronan Farrow's book "Catch and Kill" is coming out soon, and already causing drama.

from Hollywood Breakdown

This is Rob Long and on today’s Martini Shot I suddenly remember I blocked someone’s number when I see on Facebook that they’ve died, and yes I know that makes me a bad person.

from Martini Shot

As the House barrels towards impeachment proceedings following the reveal of the whistleblower's complaint, viewers are not surprisingly, turning to cable to figure out what's going…

from Screengrab

Shannon James has a full-time job as a dock worker at the Port of Long Beach.

from Greater LA

This week, Disney Plus posted a super long Twitter thread listing all the content that'll come with its streaming service next month.

from Screengrab

Salman Rushdie’s Quichotte depicts the pleasures of fiction.

from Bookworm

66 million years ago, an asteroid caused Earth’s Fifth Extinction, destroying the dinosaurs and most other life forms. Now Earth is facing another extinction, as fish, plants and animals vanish forever. But this time, it’s not the asteroid, it’s us. This week, hundreds of people, both young and old, took to the streets in cities all over the world to begin weeks of protest called the Extinction Rebellion. In the natural course of evolution, the decline and disappearance of a life form takes thousands of years. In the course of a human lifetime, not even one species might disappear. But now, some 28,000 species are vanishing all of a sudden. Elizabeth Kolbert of the New Yorker magazine has written a book called “The Sixth Extinction.” She says, “Extinction rates are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times higher than what is known as the background extinction rate that has pertained over most of geological history.” In her words, “You should not be able to see all sorts of mammals -- to name just one group -- either going extinct or on the verge of extinction. And that is a tipoff that something very, very unusual, and I would add, very dangerous, is going on.” “We’re running geological history backwards. Fossil fuels that were created over the course of hundreds of millions of years buried a lot of carbon underground. We’re now combusting it, putting that carbon back into the atmosphere over a matter of centuries. So we’re taking a process that hundreds of millions of years to run in one direction and then, in a matter of centuries, running it in another direction.” We’ll hear what that means now and for the future of life as we know it.

from To the Point

If you’re feeling insufficiently anxious in your life, “Joker” could be just the ticket. If not, look elsewhere to be entertained.

from Film Reviews