Einar Kjartansson

Geophysicist, Icelandic Meteorological Office

Guest

Geophysicist at the Icelandic Meteorological Office

Einar Kjartansson on KCRW

Air travel in Europe is almost back to normal, although shifting winds have sent plumes of volcanic ash over Scotland and Scandinavia, forcing some airports to close again.

Are We Prepared for Volcanic Disruption?

Air travel in Europe is almost back to normal, although shifting winds have sent plumes of volcanic ash over Scotland and Scandinavia, forcing some airports to close again.

from Which Way, L.A.?

Airports in Europe are back in business, although shifting winds have sent plumes of volcanic ash over Scotland and Scandinavia, forcing some airports to close again.

Are We Prepared for Volcanic Disruption?

Airports in Europe are back in business, although shifting winds have sent plumes of volcanic ash over Scotland and Scandinavia, forcing some airports to close again.

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