Elizabeth Douglass

Energy writer at the Los Angeles Times

Guest

Energy writer at the Los Angeles Times

Elizabeth Douglass on KCRW

Gasoline and diesel fuel expand when temperatures rise and shrink when it cools down.  That means in warm weather you're probably getting less than you pay for.  The difference may not…

Customers Get Less than They Paid for with 'Hot Fuel'

Gasoline and diesel fuel expand when temperatures rise and shrink when it cools down.  That means in warm weather you're probably getting less than you pay for.  The difference may not…

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