Elizabeth McKenzie

author and editor

Guest

Author; Senior Editor of the Chicago Quarterly Review and Managing Editor of the Catamaran Literary Reader

Elizabeth McKenzie on KCRW

Elizabeth McKenzie's half screwball romantic comedy and half critique of the conspicuous consumption of the leisure class, featuring a heroine named after the depressive American…

Elizabeth McKenzie: The Portable Veblen

Elizabeth McKenzie's half screwball romantic comedy and half critique of the conspicuous consumption of the leisure class, featuring a heroine named after the depressive American…

from Bookworm

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