Erika Engelhaupt

National Geographic

Guest

Editor at the National Geographic

Erika Engelhaupt on KCRW

Photo:  Gerd Ludwig, National Geographic Creative  
 In a place where nobody thought it could happen, wildlife appears to be abundant. Wolves howl near the Chernobyl nuclear power…

Animals Are Masters of Chernobyl's Poisoned Land

Photo: Gerd Ludwig, National Geographic Creative In a place where nobody thought it could happen, wildlife appears to be abundant. Wolves howl near the Chernobyl nuclear power…

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