Geoffrey R. Stone

University of Chicago Law School

Guest

Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor, and former dean, at the University of Chicago Law School and author of Speaking Out!: Reflections on Law, Liberty and Justice; former law clerk for the late Justice William Brennan

Geoffrey R. Stone on KCRW

Some elite colleges and universities go back to the days of segregation and even slavery. Now students are demanding they at least acknowledge the racist past.

Princeton, Woodrow Wilson, and the Legacy of Forebears

Some elite colleges and universities go back to the days of segregation and even slavery. Now students are demanding they at least acknowledge the racist past.

from To the Point

Edward Snowden says he went to work for a defense contractor so he could inform the American public about the government's secret surveillance of telephone and Internet conversations.

Secrecy, Diplomacy and Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden says he went to work for a defense contractor so he could inform the American public about the government's secret surveillance of telephone and Internet conversations.

from To the Point

The US Supreme Court has  upheld  President Obama's  Affordable Care Act , a short-term victory with long-term consequences for health care, the powers of Congress and the presidential…

Healthcare: The Law and the Politics

The US Supreme Court has upheld President Obama's Affordable Care Act , a short-term victory with long-term consequences for health care, the powers of Congress and the presidential…

from Which Way, L.A.?

More from KCRW

It’s been two weeks since a gunman in San Jose reported to work, opened fire, and killed nine people before killing himself.

Legalizing the sale of cannabis in California has turned out to be a fruitful endeavor for the state thanks to taxes.

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With the state’s color-coded reopening tiers riding off into the sunset, there’s no more social distancing, and masks in almost every indoor situation are being retired.

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For African Americans, June 19 (Juneteenth) is both a celebration of freedom and an occasion of somber remembrance.

from Life Examined

On June 15, the Golden State is saying goodbye to many of the regulations that have shaped daily life for the last pandemic year.

from KCRW Features

Echo Park Lake reopened to the public this week after two months of being closed for repairs, with some obvious changes.

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Josh Barro speaks with Liz Bruenig and Ross Douthat about the Biden’s trip to Europe.

from Left, Right & Center

Vice President Kamala Harris visited Central America this week. She told would-be migrants in Guatemala “do not come” (to the U.S.), which drew criticism from progressive democrats.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

For most of American history, abortion has been legal, outlawed only from 1867 to 1973. Now the U.S. Supreme Court might outlaw it again by overturning Roe v. Wade.

from To the Point