George Smart

Chair, Executive Director of North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) and USModernist. Host of US Modernist Radio

Chair and Executive Director of North Carolina Modernist Houses (NCMH) and USModernist, America's largest open digital archives for Modernist residential architecture.  He is the producer and host of US Modernist Radio.


George Smart on KCRW

For the last 30 years classic LA modernist houses by the likes of Richard Neutra, Rudolf Schindler, Pierre Koenig, John Lautner and others have been bought, lovingly restored and have…

Lovell Health House seeks pick-me-up

For the last 30 years classic LA modernist houses by the likes of Richard Neutra, Rudolf Schindler, Pierre Koenig, John Lautner and others have been bought, lovingly restored and have…

from Design and Architecture

A rendering of The Bridge House, designed by Dan Brunn Architecture.

Is modernism the new LA house style?

A rendering of The Bridge House, designed by Dan Brunn Architecture.

from Design and Architecture

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