Harvey Kubernik

music journalist and author

Guest

Music journalist and author of books including Turn Up the Radio!: Rock, Pop, and Roll in Los Angeles 1956-1972

Harvey Kubernik on KCRW

Dj Art Laboe has been a fixture of L.A. radio for more than 60 years...until this week.

Making the Art Laboe Connection

Dj Art Laboe has been a fixture of L.A. radio for more than 60 years...until this week.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

When people think of LA, they almost always think of Hollywood and the film industry. But it’s no secret that the LA music scene has been one of the most influential in the world.

Rock 'n' Roll Los Angeles

When people think of LA, they almost always think of Hollywood and the film industry. But it’s no secret that the LA music scene has been one of the most influential in the world.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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