Ian Brennan

co-creator of “Hollywood” on Netflix

Ian Brennan on KCRW

The new Netflix miniseries “Hollywood” is set in the 1940s. It tells the story of Hollywood’s Golden Age through the eyes of aspiring actors, a director, and screenwriter.

Netflix’s ‘Hollywood’ explores racism and sexism in the industry

The new Netflix miniseries “Hollywood” is set in the 1940s. It tells the story of Hollywood’s Golden Age through the eyes of aspiring actors, a director, and screenwriter.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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