Jacqueline Fuchs

Writer and lawyer, and played bass in The Runaways

Guest

Jackie Fuchs is an entertainment attorney with a law degree from Harvard and a Bachelors Degree in Linguistics, summa cum laude, from UCLA. As Jackie Fox, she was the bass player for the 70’s all-female rock band The Runaways (with future superstars Joan Jett and Lita Ford) and can be heard on the albums The Runaways, Queens of Noise, The Runaways Live in Japan, and 20th Century Masters – The Millenium Collection: The Best of the Runaways, among others. She can be seen in the motion picture Edgeplay: A Film About the Runaways, on which she also served as Executive Producer. She has a popular website and blog at www.myspace.com/jackiefuchs and was the first guest blogger for the Environmental Working Group’s Pets for the Environment website. She is the author of The Well, an unpublished work of young adult historical fiction, and is currently working on her second novel.

Jacqueline Fuchs on KCRW

Warning: this story concerns sexual assault and has and has some graphic descriptions.  The girl rock group The Runaways rocked the 70s with hits like “Cherry Bomb” and “Wild Thing.”

The Runaways' Jackie Fox

Warning: this story concerns sexual assault and has and has some graphic descriptions. The girl rock group The Runaways rocked the 70s with hits like “Cherry Bomb” and “Wild Thing.”

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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