Jay DeLancy

Voter Integrity Project

Guest

Jay Delancy is Director of the Voter Integrity Project, a conservative election watchdog group.

Jay DeLancy on KCRW

In many states, Republican claims of widespread "voter fraud" have led to photo ID laws and other restrictions that Democrats call "voter suppression."

Ballot box battles as the race comes down to the wire

In many states, Republican claims of widespread "voter fraud" have led to photo ID laws and other restrictions that Democrats call "voter suppression."

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