Jesse Keenan

Harvard

Guest

Professor at Harvard.

Jesse Keenan on KCRW

The 30-year mortgage might be a casualty of global warming. That’s because rising sea levels, worsening drought and wildfires make the future of many homes uncertain.

Climate change now affects whether you can get a mortgage

The 30-year mortgage might be a casualty of global warming. That’s because rising sea levels, worsening drought and wildfires make the future of many homes uncertain.

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