Jessica Bruder

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism; author of "Nomadland"

Guest

Jessica Bruder is an award-winning journalist whose writing focuses on innovation and creative thought, with an emphasis on contemporary subcultures and the D.I.Y. renaissance. She writes Start, the New York Times blog on new indie businesses, and is the author of "Burning Book" (Simon & Schuster), a narrative nonfiction account of the annual Burning Man festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. The Los Angeles Times called her writing "quietly poetic."

Bruder has written for The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor, CNN, the AP and other outlets. She worked as a staff writer at The New York Observer and The Oregonian, and as a senior editor at Fortune Small Business magazine. She also launched and edited CNNMoney's weekly Innovation Nation column.

Bruder received her M.S. and won a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She earned her B.A. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa at Amherst College, where she was awarded the school's Laura Ayres Snyder Poetry Prize and an Alpha Delta Phi/David P. Patchel Memorial Fund grant to study censorship in South Africa. This is her fourth year teaching at the Journalism School.

Jessica Bruder on KCRW

Many people don’t want to board planes for COVID-19 safety reasons, and they’re concerned about hotels and Airbnbs. They're turning to camping instead, and RV sales are exploding.

RV sales are up as people try to make something of a summer lost to COVID

Many people don’t want to board planes for COVID-19 safety reasons, and they’re concerned about hotels and Airbnbs. They're turning to camping instead, and RV sales are exploding.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More and more seniors are finding it impossible to retire. Some take part-time jobs to supplement their social security. For others, the situation is more dire.

The End of Retirement

More and more seniors are finding it impossible to retire. Some take part-time jobs to supplement their social security. For others, the situation is more dire.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Josh and Ken talk about the indictment of Steve Bannon, the end of Summer Zervos’ defamation lawsuit against former President Trump, and more.

from All the Presidents' Lawyers

The supply chain is still clogged and inflation is at a 30-year high , while the U.S. has been importing more overseas goods than before the COVID pandemic.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Starting in January and throughout 2022, the City of LA plans to give 3,200 families in poverty $1,000 a month — with no conditions. The $38 million program is called “ BIG:LEAP .”

from Greater LA

It’s not RICO, but this is the final episode of All The Presidents’ Lawyers.

from All the Presidents' Lawyers

Josh, Liz and Tim discuss the infrastructure bill-turned-law and booster shots. We bring on special guest Ali Wyne to talk about the future of U.S. – China relations.

from Left, Right & Center

On this week’s Life Examined, how health organizations and employers are recognizing that workplace burnout is a real and growing problem.

from Life Examined

In The Hollywood Reporter , Kim Masters and Gary Baum did a deep dive into the shady side of independent filmmaking.

from Hollywood Breakdown

Josh Barro, Liz Bruenig and Ross Douthat discuss the high rate of inflation, its political risk and what (if anything) the president can do about it.

from Left, Right & Center

The new Netflix documentary “Procession” follows Dan Laurine and five other victims of sexual abuse by Catholic priests, as they use drama to ease the burden of their traumatic…

from The Business