Jessica Bruder

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism; author of "Nomadland"

Guest

Jessica Bruder is an award-winning journalist whose writing focuses on innovation and creative thought, with an emphasis on contemporary subcultures and the D.I.Y. renaissance. She writes Start, the New York Times blog on new indie businesses, and is the author of "Burning Book" (Simon & Schuster), a narrative nonfiction account of the annual Burning Man festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. The Los Angeles Times called her writing "quietly poetic."

Bruder has written for The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor, CNN, the AP and other outlets. She worked as a staff writer at The New York Observer and The Oregonian, and as a senior editor at Fortune Small Business magazine. She also launched and edited CNNMoney's weekly Innovation Nation column.

Bruder received her M.S. and won a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She earned her B.A. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa at Amherst College, where she was awarded the school's Laura Ayres Snyder Poetry Prize and an Alpha Delta Phi/David P. Patchel Memorial Fund grant to study censorship in South Africa. This is her fourth year teaching at the Journalism School.

Jessica Bruder on KCRW

Many people don’t want to board planes for COVID-19 safety reasons, and they’re concerned about hotels and Airbnbs. They're turning to camping instead, and RV sales are exploding.

RV sales are up as people try to make something of a summer lost to COVID

Many people don’t want to board planes for COVID-19 safety reasons, and they’re concerned about hotels and Airbnbs. They're turning to camping instead, and RV sales are exploding.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More and more seniors are finding it impossible to retire. Some take part-time jobs to supplement their social security. For others, the situation is more dire.

The End of Retirement

More and more seniors are finding it impossible to retire. Some take part-time jobs to supplement their social security. For others, the situation is more dire.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

California officials laid out new rules — or lack of them — for what reopening on June 15 means. Life will look a lot different than what we’ve been experiencing for well over a year

from KCRW Features

For most of American history, abortion has been legal, outlawed only from 1867 to 1973. Now the U.S. Supreme Court might outlaw it again by overturning Roe v. Wade.

from To the Point

As a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, U.S.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

WE RISE is an initiative from the LA County Department of Mental Health that features 21 art experiences focusing on connection.

from Greater LA

Crowns & Hops , based in Inglewood, will be LA’s first Black-owned brewery.

from Greater LA

The number of businesses in the U.S. that no longer accept cash has doubled since the pandemic began, according to a recent survey by Square.

from Greater LA

Locals identify Crenshaw Boulevard as the main artery of Black culture in Los Angeles, while the man it’s named for was white.

from Greater LA

It’s been two weeks since a gunman in San Jose reported to work, opened fire, and killed nine people before killing himself.

More than half of all American adults have been vaccinated, according to the Biden administration, and life is seemingly speeding back to normal.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand