Jim Acosta

CNN chief White House correspondent and author of “The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America,”

CNN chief White House correspondent and author of “The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America,”

Jim Acosta on KCRW

When the Chief Executive lies repeatedly, what’s a reporter to do?  CNN’s Jim Acosta defends his multiple public challenges of Donald Trump in a book called, “The Enemy of the People.”

CNN and President Trump: Truth and Truth Decay

When the Chief Executive lies repeatedly, what’s a reporter to do?  CNN’s Jim Acosta defends his multiple public challenges of Donald Trump in a book called, “The Enemy of the People.”

from To the Point

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Climate change is an existential crisis. If Americans cut just one hamburger from their diet every week, it would be like taking 10 million cars off the road every year. After cutting energy use, less meat and more plant-based food add up to the easiest--and healthiest--way to reduce your carbon footprint. From the land and water needed to raise feed and the methane produced at the end of digestion, “Cattle are actually mini fossil-fuel, greenhouse gas producers.” So says Sujatha Bergen, head of health campaigns at the NRDC. As her title suggests, eliminating beef from your diet--in addition to pork and lamb-- is also better for you. She explains the trade-offs for helping to reduce climate change and says, “Starting with your fork is much less daunting for many people.”

from To the Point