John Banville

Guest

Irish novelist who also writes crime-fiction under the pseudonym, Benjamin Black; winner of the 2005 Man Booker Prize for his novel, The Sea

John Banville on KCRW

John Banville (Benjamin Black): Black-Eyed Blonde

from Bookworm

John Banville (as Benjamin Black): Christine Falls

from Bookworm

Tom Wolfe discusses neuroscience and its view that there is no such thing as identity. Margaret Atwood talks about the coming threat to identity by cloning and genetic experimentation.

Beyond Identity--A Dark Vision (Part 9 of 10)

Tom Wolfe discusses neuroscience and its view that there is no such thing as identity. Margaret Atwood talks about the coming threat to identity by cloning and genetic experimentation.

from Bookworm

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