John Chase

City of West Hollywood

Guest

Urban designer for the City of West Hollywood and co-author of Everyday Urbanism

John Chase on KCRW

In San Francisco two years ago, a group called  Rebar  descended on a number of parking spaces. They fed money into the meters, rolled out sod, and installed trees and benches.

Transforming Parking Space into Open Space

In San Francisco two years ago, a group called Rebar descended on a number of parking spaces. They fed money into the meters, rolled out sod, and installed trees and benches.

from Which Way, L.A.?

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