John Schmidt

Former US Associate Attorney General

Guest

Former Associate Attorney General in the Justice Department under President Clinton; partner in the Chicago law firm of Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw

John Schmidt on KCRW

It's been less than a week since Britain's  MI-5 intelligence service said 1600 people are under surveillance  for 30 terrorist plots linked to al Qaeda in Pakistan.

The War against Terror and Civil Rights

It's been less than a week since Britain's MI-5 intelligence service said 1600 people are under surveillance for 30 terrorist plots linked to al Qaeda in Pakistan.

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