Jon Burlingame

professor of film and TV scoring at USC’s Thornton School of Music.

Guest

Jon Burlingame is the nation’s leading writer on the subject of music for films and television. He writes regularly for Variety and has written on the topic for such other publications as The New York TimesLos Angeles Times, the Washington Post,NewsdayEmmyPremiere and The Hollywood Reporter

He is the author of four books: the best-selling The Music of James Bond (Oxford University Press, 2012), the film-composer encyclopedia Sound and Vision: 60 Years of Motion Picture Soundtracks (Billboard Books, 2000), the television-music history TV’s Biggest Hits (Schirmer Books, 1996) and the Hollywood studio-musician chronicle For the Record (Recording Musicians Association, 1997).He has also contributed chapters to other books, including one on Leonard Bernstein in On the Waterfront (Cambridge University Press, 2003), on John Williams in Boston Pops: America’s Orchestra (2000) and on Elmer Bernstein in Moving Music: Conversations With Renowned Film Composers (2003).

Burlingame teaches film-music history at the University of Southern California and has often lectured on music for films and TV in Los Angeles, New York, Washington, D.C., Miami and Switzerland. He has served as a consultant on film- and TV-music programs for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the National Symphony Orchestra, the American Film Institute and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Jon Burlingame on KCRW

The Game of Thrones theme has spawned a million earworms, and it’s just one theme indicative of the current golden age of original television music.

The Golden Age of Television Music

The Game of Thrones theme has spawned a million earworms, and it’s just one theme indicative of the current golden age of original television music.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

They say that if you notice a film’s score, it’s not doing its job. Of course, anyone can hum the theme to “Jaws.”

Runaway Film Scoring Leaves Some Musicians Behind

They say that if you notice a film’s score, it’s not doing its job. Of course, anyone can hum the theme to “Jaws.”

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

Bob Hertzberg, one of the three leading candidates seeking to represent the 3rd District of the LA County Board of Supervisors, speaks with KCRW and KPCC/LAist.

The Supreme Court is likely to end Roe v. Wade this summer. How could that affect states’ rights and other rulings on privacy, like gay marriage?

from Left, Right & Center

Californians still support high-speed rail. But commentator Joe Mathews says state politicians are killing any chance of success by downsizing the bullet train.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

The United Nations can’t stop Russia’s war on Ukraine. And author Yascha Mounk says more diversity is a threat to democracy, but he’s still hopeful.

from To the Point

This past weekend, six mass shootings rocked communities across the U.S. What’s causing the rise in gun violence?

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Fabiola Moreno Ruelas is a San Diego State student who’s set to graduate after juggling multiple jobs to pay her bills while helping other students in need.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

Business is booming for a maker of the prefab homeless shelters known as tiny homes. Can a company banking on homelessness also help alleviate it?

from Greater LA

To prevent small businesses from being priced out of Boyle Heights, a nonprofit is buying commercial property and offering tenants a share in ownership.

from Greater LA

Zócalo commentator Joe Mathews is a fierce defender of direct democracy. But he says California’s take on citizen power is making things worse.

from Zócalo's Connecting California