Jon Burlingame

professor of film and TV scoring at USC’s Thornton School of Music.

Guest

Jon Burlingame is the nation’s leading writer on the subject of music for films and television. He writes regularly for Variety and has written on the topic for such other publications as The New York TimesLos Angeles Times, the Washington Post,NewsdayEmmyPremiere and The Hollywood Reporter

He is the author of four books: the best-selling The Music of James Bond (Oxford University Press, 2012), the film-composer encyclopedia Sound and Vision: 60 Years of Motion Picture Soundtracks (Billboard Books, 2000), the television-music history TV’s Biggest Hits (Schirmer Books, 1996) and the Hollywood studio-musician chronicle For the Record (Recording Musicians Association, 1997).He has also contributed chapters to other books, including one on Leonard Bernstein in On the Waterfront (Cambridge University Press, 2003), on John Williams in Boston Pops: America’s Orchestra (2000) and on Elmer Bernstein in Moving Music: Conversations With Renowned Film Composers (2003).

Burlingame teaches film-music history at the University of Southern California and has often lectured on music for films and TV in Los Angeles, New York, Washington, D.C., Miami and Switzerland. He has served as a consultant on film- and TV-music programs for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the National Symphony Orchestra, the American Film Institute and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Jon Burlingame on KCRW

The Game of Thrones theme has spawned a million earworms, and it’s just one theme indicative of the current golden age of original television music.

The Golden Age of Television Music

The Game of Thrones theme has spawned a million earworms, and it’s just one theme indicative of the current golden age of original television music.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

They say that if you notice a film’s score, it’s not doing its job. Of course, anyone can hum the theme to “Jaws.”

Runaway Film Scoring Leaves Some Musicians Behind

They say that if you notice a film’s score, it’s not doing its job. Of course, anyone can hum the theme to “Jaws.”

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

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