Jonathan Goldstein

Jonathan Goldstein

CBC, producer of WireTap

Jonathan Goldstein's writing has appeared in The Walrus, The New York Times, GQ, and The National Post. He is a frequent contributor to PRI's This American Life and the New York Times Magazine, and was a 2002 co-recipient of The Third Coast Audio Festival's Gold Prize. In 2004, he was awarded a Canadian National Magazine award for humor. He is author of 'Lenny Bruce is Dead' and 'Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bible!'. His latest book, 'I'll Seize the Day Tomorrow', is available for purchase online.

Jonathan Goldstein on KCRW

Today, a special for the beginning of the holiday season…. a compilation of family stories from the first year of this program.

Holiday Buffet

Today, a special for the beginning of the holiday season…. a compilation of family stories from the first year of this program.

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