Jonathan Handel

entertainment attorney and contributing editor at The Hollywood Reporter

Guest

Of counsel at the law firm of TroyGould, specializing in digital media, entertainment and technology law; blogger at the Huffington Post and DigitalMediaLaw.blogspot.com, and reporter for the Hollywood Reporter; former associate counsel for the Writers' Guild of America and at a small boutique law firm representing movie stars and directors

Jonathan Handel on KCRW

The Writers Guild of America still doesn’t have a deal with the talent agencies. Those agents were fired because of so-called packaging deals.

Drama in Writers Guild and SAG-AFTRA elections

The Writers Guild of America still doesn’t have a deal with the talent agencies. Those agents were fired because of so-called packaging deals.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

As of July 1, three major agencies (WME, UTA and CAA) are suing the Writers Guild. They say the Guild is violating antitrust laws by organizing an unlawful group boycott.

Will Hollywood writers give up their agents for good?

As of July 1, three major agencies (WME, UTA and CAA) are suing the Writers Guild. They say the Guild is violating antitrust laws by organizing an unlawful group boycott.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

There is still no progress in the talks between writers and their agents about a new code of conduct.

How the Writers Guild protest could change the industry

There is still no progress in the talks between writers and their agents about a new code of conduct.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

More from KCRW

For the first time, PBS will stream live on a so-called "skinny bundle," YouTube TV.

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For a monthly fee, the Santa Monica startup Carenote connects lonely Americans with a person in the Philippines who calls regularly to chat.

from Greater LA

The death of the nation’s longest serving federal judge is a reminder about our lack of effective judicial oversight.

from Zócalo's Connecting California

For years, The CW and Netflix had a deal that worked well for both of them. With that pact now done, The CW looks toward a different kind of digital future.

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The Warner Bros show 'Extra' is having a rough go of it this week.

from Hollywood Breakdown

The Peanut Butter Falcon is a certified feelgood film that has no use for naked tenderness, disability sentimentality or full-frontal sweetness.

from Film Reviews

This is the first quarter that Fox assets have been included in Disney's earnings report, and the results were not as strong as expected.

from Hollywood Breakdown

California’s relentless clean-air enforcer, Mary Nichols, has divided the automobile industry. After weeks of secret negotiations, the Chair of the State’s Air Resources Board has announced that Ford, Honda VW and BMW of America won’t go along with President Trump’s rollback of Barack Obama’s fuel-economy standards. Nichols claims it’s an “olive branch,” giving car makers the “flexibility” to clean up the air at the same time they continue to market vehicles that make the most money. Brady Dennis of the Washington Post calls it a “big deal,” even if Toyota, GM and 11 other companies revert to Trump’s new federal standards--at least for the moment. Alan Baum is a consultant for both the industry and environmental organizations. He says the four who made the deal with California have a slight lead on their competitors in developing the technology of the future, with China currently far ahead of them all. He says the western car makers are doing a poor job of educating consumers about the benefits of hybrids and electrics. Nichols’s history with the Air Resources Board goes back to the 1970’s. She was named Chair by Republican Governor Arnold Schwartenegger and reappointed by Democrats Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom. She made an international name for herself for years ago when she blew the whistle on Volkswagen for faking emissions tests on the diesel cars it sold for decades all over the world.

from To the Point

When filmmaker Lulu Wang set out to write and direct a personal movie based on a real-life family saga, she had a clear vision for an American film, largely set in China, mostly in…

from The Business