Jonathan Schanzer

Foundation for the Defense of Democracies

Guest

Jonathan Schanzer is vice president for research at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, a DC-based think-tank studying terrorism in the Middle East. A former terror finance analyst for the US Treasury, Schanzer is the author of several books on the Middle East, including Hamas Versus Fatah: The Struggle for Palestine and State of Failure: Yasser Arafat, Mahmoud Abbas, and the Unmaking of the Palestinian State.

Jonathan Schanzer on KCRW

In 2015, the Obama Administration struck a landmark deal with Iran and other world powers to curtail the Iranian nuclear program.

Trump Administration takes a new hard line approach to Iran

In 2015, the Obama Administration struck a landmark deal with Iran and other world powers to curtail the Iranian nuclear program.

from To the Point

Responding to his first challenge from the world's most volatile region, President Trump has invoked economic sanctions against Iran.

The US and Iran: Diplomatic relations turn icy again

Responding to his first challenge from the world's most volatile region, President Trump has invoked economic sanctions against Iran.

from To the Point

President Obama says Iran's nuclear program has been "halted" -- but a final settlement seems far in the future.

Nuclear Development and Middle East Stability

President Obama says Iran's nuclear program has been "halted" -- but a final settlement seems far in the future.

from To the Point

More from KCRW

Jeffrey Epstein was found dead in his cell at the Manhattan Correctional Center on Saturday, as he awaited trial. What happens next in the investigation?

from LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers

Will mass shootings become part of America’s background noise?   That’s an ugly prospect raised by the deaths of 34 people this week in Texas, Ohio and California.

from To the Point

Once again it’s the race for the White House as Reality TV, with  20 performers focused on making the next audition. Are “bold proposals” politically risky?

from To the Point

This week, the political debate dominated political debate.

from Left, Right & Center

A new investigative report uncovers rampant exploitation of caregivers at residential care homes across the nation, many of them poor immigrants who work for a pittance around the…

from Scheer Intelligence

The communities of Gilroy, El Paso and Dayton are recovering after attackers shot and killed at least 34 people and injured dozens more.  Erroll Southers, Director of Homegrown…

from KCRW Features

Last week's mass shooting in El Paso has been particularly painful for Angelenos, because so many have close ties to that city.

from Greater LA

Playboy Magazine built a culture of objectifying women that doesn't fly in the #MeToo era.

from Press Play with Madeleine Brand

California’s relentless clean-air enforcer, Mary Nichols, has divided the automobile industry. After weeks of secret negotiations, the Chair of the State’s Air Resources Board has announced that Ford, Honda VW and BMW of America won’t go along with President Trump’s rollback of Barack Obama’s fuel-economy standards. Nichols claims it’s an “olive branch,” giving car makers the “flexibility” to clean up the air at the same time they continue to market vehicles that make the most money. Brady Dennis of the Washington Post calls it a “big deal,” even if Toyota, GM and 11 other companies revert to Trump’s new federal standards--at least for the moment. Alan Baum is a consultant for both the industry and environmental organizations. He says the four who made the deal with California have a slight lead on their competitors in developing the technology of the future, with China currently far ahead of them all. He says the western car makers are doing a poor job of educating consumers about the benefits of hybrids and electrics. Nichols’s history with the Air Resources Board goes back to the 1970’s. She was named Chair by Republican Governor Arnold Schwartenegger and reappointed by Democrats Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom. She made an international name for herself for years ago when she blew the whistle on Volkswagen for faking emissions tests on the diesel cars it sold for decades all over the world.

from To the Point