Judith Stacey

New York University

Guest

Professor of Sociology at New York University and author of Unhitched: Love, Marriage and Family Values from West Hollywood to Western China

Judith Stacey on KCRW

The federal Defense of Marriage Act was cobbled together in 1996, after the Supreme Court of Hawaii suggested there might be a right to same-sex marriage.

State Laws, Federal Laws and the Institution of Marriage

The federal Defense of Marriage Act was cobbled together in 1996, after the Supreme Court of Hawaii suggested there might be a right to same-sex marriage.

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