Juliana Espinal

doctoral student in Hispanic literature

Guest

Juliana Espinal on KCRW

Studies have shown that living near freeways can lead to all sorts of negative health outcomes, from asthma and heart attacks to pre-term births and even autism.

The health impact of living near freeways

Studies have shown that living near freeways can lead to all sorts of negative health outcomes, from asthma and heart attacks to pre-term births and even autism.

from Design and Architecture

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